Bulletin – week of October 20 – semaine du 20 octobre

In this bulletin: Election Day; OCA News; an IMPORTANT social services petition; and, Crime Prevention Ottawa awards and new booklet in Somali and Arabic…

Election Day: Don’t forget to vote tomorrow, Monday, October 21! Polls will be open from 9:30 am to 9:30 pm. For more information on voting, visit the Elections Canada website: English; en français. If you’re still undecided, you can watch an Ottawa-Vanier debate on Rogers by clicking here.

OCA News: Welcome to new OCA Board members, Danika Brisson, Marie-Christine Blais. Marjolaine Provost and Mercedes Marcano! “Au revoir” and huge thank yous to departing members, Monjur Chowdhury, Patrick Venier and Wendy Dennys.

Our October 17 AGM featured great presentations on a safety theme!

  • Crime Prevention Ottawa has recently confirmed funding for a safety coordinator for Overbrook. The coordinator will facilitate community-driven initiatives.
  • The Ottawa Police Service is about to launch a Neighbourhood Policing Pilot in Vanier-Overbrook and two other Ottawa areas. Expect to see 5 new Neighbourhood Officers building relationships with Vanier-Overbrook residents in the coming weeks. Carleton University researchers will be assessing the pilot and looking for community feedback.
  • Now is the time to get involved with the OCA Safety Committee, which will be involved in all this and more! The Committee meets at 7 pm on the second Thursday of every month at the Overbrook Community Centre. All are welcome!

Social Services Matter: Sign the Petition! / Les services sociaux sont essentiels: signez la pétition!

The Coalition of Community Health and Resource Centres of Ottawa are seeking your support to sign this petition and to forward it to your contacts, so that we can let City Council know that Social Services Matter!

Two years ago, non-profit social services in Ottawa completed a survey from the Social Planning Council of Ottawa that highlighted our budgetary and service pressures.

The 2018 Community Wellbeing Report highlights serious concerns about the capacity of community services to respond to critical community issues. In the face of chronic underfunding, many organizations are at a crisis point, particularly those called upon to address the increasing difficulty for thousands of residents to meet basic needs.

In response, many organizations from the non-profit social services sector are leading a campaign to expand non-profit social services, and invest at least $5 million, over and above existing funding, for non-profit social services in Ottawa during the 2019-2022 Term of Council.

Please join us by signing this petition, and by helping us to get the message out on social media. We can be found tweeting about this at the Coalition’s Twitter handle @CHRC_Ottawa.

Please get in touch with Andrea Poncia if you would like to find out how you, or your organization can get more involved in this important campaign.

Andrea can be reached at 613.325.2619, or by email at aponcia@swchc.on.ca.


Veuillez signer cette pétition et la transmettre à vos contacts afin que nous puissions informer le conseil municipal d’Ottawa que les services sociaux sont essentiels!

Il y a deux ans, les services sociaux sans but lucratif à Ottawa ont répondu à un sondage administré par le Conseil de planification sociale d’Ottawa. L’enquête a mis en lumière de sérieuses pressions budgétaires. Le Rapport sur le bien-être communautaire d’Ottawa a révélé que, confrontés à un sous-financement chronique, de nombreuses organisations se trouvaient en crise, en particulier celles appelées à faire face aux difficultés croissantes rencontrées par des milliers de résidents pour satisfaire leurs besoins essentiels.

En réponse, de nombreuses organisations du secteur de services sociaux à but non lucratif, mènent une campagne visant à soutenir ces services, et à exhorter le conseil municipal d’Ottawa à investir au moins 5 millions de dollars, en sus du financement existant, dans les services sociaux à but non lucratif.

La pétition se trouve à l’adresse suivante, ou vous pouvez imprimer et faire circuler la pétition en papier ci-jointe.

Veuillez contacter Andrea Poncia si vous souhaitez savoir comment vous, ou votre organisation, pouvez participer davantage à cette campagne importante. Vous pouvez communiquer avec Andrea par téléphone au 613.325.2619.

Crime Prevention Ottawa – Prévention du crime Ottawa

Save the date: 2019 Crime Prevention Ottawa Awards November 4 / Réservez la date : remise des Prix Prévention du crime Ottawa de 2019 le 4 novembre

Click here for more information. / Cliquez ici pour plus de renseignements : https://overbrook.ca/2019-crime-prevention-ottawa-awards-prix-prevention-du-crime-ottawa-de-2019/

“Best seller” booklet on youth criminal justice now in Arabic and Somali! / Notre très populaire brochure sur la justice pénale pour les adolescents est maintenant offerte en arabe et en somali!

Click here for more information. / Cliquez ici pour plus de renseignements : https://overbrook.ca/best-seller-booklet-on-youth-criminal-justice-now-in-arabic-and-somali-notre-tres-populaire-brochure-sur-la-justice-penale-pour-les-adolescents-est-maintenant-offerte-en-arabe-et-en/

Petition to request Ottawa to enact a LOW INCOME TRANSIT PASS

Ottawa Needs a Low Income Transit Pass 

Whereas, an affordable, inclusive and equitable transportation system helps ensure safe, healthy communities, people, and a strong economy; and

Whereas, the municipalities of Cornwall, Guelph, Halton Region, Hamilton, Kingston, Peterborough, Waterloo and Windsor have all enacted low-income public transit passes;

Therefore, we, the undersigned, ask that Mayor Jim Watson, Ottawa City Council, and the Transit Commission work together urgently to enact a low-income public transit pass in the nation’s capital. The low-income public transit pass should be designed to benefit all people whose income is less than the Low-Income Cut-Off, as defined by Statistics Canada.

Note: 

Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO) is an income threshold below which a family will likely devote a larger share of its income on the necessities of food, shelter and clothing than the average family.

For example, in Ottawa, if a single person’s income is $23,298 before tax, they are considered low-income. If a family of four’s income is $44,340 before tax, they are considered low-income.

Sign here: http://healthytransportationcoalition.nationbuilder.com/transit_pass_petition?recruiter_id=963